Disaster Risk Reduction and Open Data Newsletter: May 2022 Edition

Sea levels rising twice as fast as thought in New Zealand
Explosive new data shows the sea level is rising twice as fast as previously thought in some parts of Aotearoa, massively reducing the number of times authorities has to respond. The major new projections show infrastructure and homes in Auckland and Wellington – as well as many other places – risk inundation decades earlier than expected.

Risk Data Hub, a renewed space to support EU countries with disaster prevention and preparedness
More than 2400 disastrous events related to natural hazards have struck Europe in the last 30 years. The Risk Data Hub (RDH) hosts resources to help authorities manage risks and justify financial support requests to cope with these major events. The ultimate goal of this comprehensive hub is to offer data to help improve risk assessments in the stages before, during and after a disaster hits Europe.

Addressing food security and climate change through regenerative agriculture
One of the significant challenges that Bangladesh faces is ensuring food security for a growing population. The most viable and holistic solution to this problem is regenerative agriculture. Regenerative agriculture is a farming system that attempts to conserve soil and contribute to multiple provisioning, regulating and supporting services of the ecosystem and aims to enhance the environmental, social and economic sustainability of food production.

After the relentless rain, South Africa sounds the alarm on the climate crisis
Survivors of South Africa’s devastating floods have described “sheet upon sheet of relentless rain” that washed away entire houses, bridges and roads, killing about 450 people and making thousands homeless. The storm, which delivered close to an entire year’s usual rainfall in 48 hours, took meteorologists by surprise and has been blamed by experts on climate change. The new disaster comes after three tropical cyclones and two tropical storms hit southeast Africa in just six weeks in the first months of this year.

Risk insurance builds climate and disaster resilience in Central America and the Caribbean
Drought-monitoring technology that is currently being embedded in water and agricultural ministries in Jordan, Lebanon, and Morocco will now be implemented in Tunisia. The satellite-based enhanced composite drought index (eCDI) supports effective drought management by enabling authorities to identify, early on, the presence and evolution of drought.

Empowering people to adapt on the frontlines of climate change
A new platform will unite climate models, impact predictions, random control trial evaluations, and humanitarian services to bring cutting-edge tools to Bangladeshi communities.

Technical Guidance on Comprehensive Risk Assessment and Planning in the Context of Climate Change
The Technical Guidance on Comprehensive Risk Assessment and Planning in the Context of Climate Change provides orientation on how risks in the context of climate change can be comprehensively and systemically addressed through risk assessment. Decision-making, planning, and integrating disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) perspectives and approaches while simultaneously linking to other goals and targets (e.g. the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)) are also discussed.

Global Risk Assessment Report 2022 (GAR2022)
GAR2022 explores how, around the world, structures are evolving to better address systemic risk. The report shows how governance systems can evolve to reflect the interconnected value of people, the planet and prosperity.

Financing for Sustainable Development Report 2022
The study of flood risk perception factors can be considered by using different paradigms. In an attempt to understand risk perception, two basic paradigms can be distinguished: rationalist and constructivist. This review paper aims to assess the importance of the rationalist and constructivist approaches in research on flood risk perception and flood risk management more broadly.

The United Nations World Water Development Report 2022: groundwater: making the invisible visible
This brief explores key improvements in data delivered by SHEAR projects. The SHEAR programme (Science for Humanitarian Emergencies and Resilience) carried out innovative research, in some of the most hazard-prone parts of the world, to better understand and forecast disasters, and minimize the risk they pose to vulnerable communities.

Compound risk analysis of natural hazards and infectious disease outbreaks
This study explores the potential impacts of compounding risk between natural hazards and infectious disease outbreaks such as the recent COVID-19 pandemic in the Central Asia Regional Economic Cooperation (CAREC) region. Compound risk occurs when two or more shock events overlap, inducing additional pressure on social and physical vulnerabilities. As part of the study, scenarios of a natural hazard occurring during an outbreak are created for each CAREC country.

The Third Multi-Hazard Early Warning Conference – 23-24 May
As we approach the mid-point of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, MHEWC-III provides a unique opportunity to review key accomplishments, and share skills, experience, and expertise within an active network of early warning practitioners.

Seventh Session of the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction (GP2022)- 23 to 28 May
The Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction is the main global forum to assess and discuss progress on the implementation of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. The seventh session of the Global Platform (GP2022) will be organized by the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR) from 23 to 28 May 2022, in Bali, Indonesia, hosted by the Government of Indonesia. The event will be co-chaired by the Government of Indonesia and UNDRR.

 

Geo Virtual Symposium – Global action for local impact – 2-5th May
With the theme ‘Global Action for Local Impact’, the GEO Virtual Symposium 2022 will explore how the portfolio of GEO products and services can provide insights and evidence for policy development and decision making, which is expected to lead to local impact over time. The symposium will foster dialogue among local stakeholders, GEO Work Programme (GWP) activities and other partners to discuss transversal environmental and societal issues, and identify potential integrative EO-based solutions in selected regions.

Call for paper Special Issue “Post-disaster Recovery and Climate Change Adaptation – an Asia-Pacific Perspective”
This Special Issue aims to present a platform for the exchange of the latest research and practices in post-disaster recovery and climate change adaptation in the Asia-Pacific region. Themes of particular interest include reasons for current inadequacies and context-specific challenges contributing to failed recovery and adaptation in the region, lessons learnt from past disaster experiences, innovative post-disaster reconstruction and recovery practices, and sustainable and practical solutions for adapting to climate change that is applicable to the Asia-Pacific region. We are seeking articles duly addressing environmental, cultural, economic and social aspects of post-disaster recovery and climate change adaptation within the scope of Sustainability.

Floods and other secondary perils: opportunity or threat for the industry?
18 May 2022

The Swiss Re Institute’s annual Natural Catastrophe sigma has become the benchmark in documenting the human and financial impact of disasters. The report compares these losses to prior years and historical averages to put the year in perspective. This hybrid event will look at the main natural catastrophe loss drivers for 2021 and how the year stacks up against others. We’ll take a deeper dive into flood risk and what the insurance industry can do to help build societal resilience in the face of increasing secondary perils.

The World Reconstruction Conference- 23-24 May 2022
The World Reconstruction Conference is a global forum that provides a platform to collect, assess, and share disaster reconstruction and recovery experiences and take forward the policy dialogue for effective international disaster recovery and reconstruction framework.

April 2022: Publications in the Data Science Journal

Title: Activities of the Polar Environment Data Science Center of ROIS-DS, Japan
Author: Akira Kadokura, Masaki Kanao, Hironori Yabuki, Yoshimasa Tanaka, Koji Nishimura
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-012
Title: Persistent Identification for Conferences
Author: Julian Franken , Aliaksandr Birukou, Kai Eckert, Wolfgang Fahl, Christian Hauschke, Christoph Lange
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-011
Title: Quality Management Framework for Climate Datasets
Author: Carlo Lacagnina, Francisco Doblas-Reyes, Gilles Larnicol, Carlo Buontempo, André Obregón, Montserrat Costa-Surós, Daniel San-Martín, Pierre-Antoine Bretonnière, Suraj D. Polade, Vanya Romanova, Davide Putero, Federico Serva, Alba Llabrés-Brustenga, Antonio Pérez, Davide Cavaliere, Olivier Membrive, Christian Steger, Núria Pérez-Zanón, Paolo Cristofanelli, Fabio Madonna, Marco Rosoldi, Aku Riihelä, Markel García Díez
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-010
Title: When Your Data is My Grandparents Singing. Digitisation and Access for Cultural Records, the Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures (PARADISEC)
Author: Nick Thieberger, Amanda Harris
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-009

Disaster Risk Reduction and Open Data Newsletter: April 2022 Edition

IPCC: Working Group III contribution to the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report
A key UN body says in a report that there must be “rapid, deep and immediate” cuts in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. After a contentious approval session where scientists and government officials went through the report line by line, the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has now published its guidance on what the world can do to avoid an extremely dangerous future.

UK announces £5 million funding to expand the Met Office’s Weather and Climate Information Services activity in the MENA region
COP26 Regional Ambassador for the Middle East and Africa Janet Rogan recently announced £5 million UK funding to expand the Met Office’s successful Weather and Climate Information Services activity to the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. The programme aims to deliver transformation in the generation and use of co-produced weather and climate services to support decision making at local, national, and regional levels, building resilience to the impacts of climate change.

Early Warning and Early Action: A look at Fiji’s Multi-Hazard Early Warning System
Tonkin + Taylor’s Technical Director – DRR and Climate Resilience Dr Bapon Fakhruddin worked closely on the project providing system integration and operationalising the forecasting and early warning system. He shares insights into the design and unique ‘bottom-up’ community approach, how it’s performed and how it can further serve Fiji and the Pacific in the future in this article.

Nature-based solutions for flood risk reduction: A probabilistic modelling framework
A team of scientists from NTU’s Asian School of the Environment (ASE), led by Assistant Professor David Lallemant and Assistant Professor Perrine Hamel, have designed a probabilistic risk analysis framework capable of addressing the challenges of quantifying nature-based solutions. It considers multiple types of storm events and can be applied to large river basins in data-scarce environments.

Tunisia joins Morocco, Lebanon, and Jordan in using state-of-the-art drought management technology
Drought-monitoring technology that is currently being embedded in water and agricultural ministries in Jordan, Lebanon, and Morocco will now be implemented in Tunisia. The satellite-based enhanced composite drought index (eCDI) supports effective drought management by enabling authorities to identify, early on, the presence and evolution of drought.

From early warning to early action: inspiring & empowering the next generation
Young professionals and youth are the future leaders of early warning and early action. They have unique communication skills, are ready to innovate with the latest technology and bring their fresh energy and enthusiasm to the forefront of any challenge. To unpick the challenges and opportunities, the Water Youth Network, the Anticipation Hub and the Associated Programme on Flood Management brought young professionals together in a webinar marking World Meteorological Day 2022 to share their lessons and needs for joint action.

Cooperation between the US and Tonga for inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction
In the spirit of international cooperation, in May 2020, the United States government, through the US Agency for International Development (USAID), launched a two-year $1.1-billion project called Inclusive Disaster Resilience in Tonga (IDIT). It is seen as the first of its kind where people living with disabilities, and related organizations, are among the anchors of the actual project. They are actively engaged in different aspects of the project instead of simply being recipients of assistance.

Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change
The Working Group III report provides an updated global assessment of climate change mitigation progress and pledges and examines the sources of global emissions. It explains developments in emission reduction and mitigation efforts, assessing the impact of national climate pledges in relation to long-term emissions goals.

The Climate Risk Tool Landscape – 2022
Given the growing number of climate risk tools and providers, UNEP FI has developed resources to inform financial institutions on the structure, coverage, and methodologies of commonly used tools. The financial sector has a central role to play in assessing and managing climate-related risks. To do so, many financial institutions are working with third-party providers to obtain the climate skills, information, and outputs they require. This report includes detailed case studies from 15 financial institutions.

Approaches in research on flood risk perception and their importance in flood risk management: a review
The study of flood risk perception factors can be considered by using different paradigms. In an attempt to understand risk perception, two basic paradigms can be distinguished: rationalist and constructivist. This review paper aims to assess the importance of the rationalist and constructivist approaches in research on flood risk perception and flood risk management more broadly.

 

Improved data to better understand exposure, vulnerabilities and hazards
This brief explores key improvements in data delivered by SHEAR projects. The SHEAR programme (Science for Humanitarian Emergencies and Resilience) carried out innovative research, in some of the most hazard-prone parts of the world, to better understand and forecast disasters, and minimize the risk they pose to vulnerable communities.

Addressing Climate Change Through Integrated Responses: Linking adaptation and mitigation
This policy brief aims to build on a series of recent peer learning events focused on addressing climate change through integrated responses by linking adaptation and mitigation at the planning and implementation stages. Countries have established national policy processes aimed at addressing these complex issues. Inherently, these policies and strategies often have interconnected objectives and common themes, which creates a foundation for alignment and joint activities to provide common solutions to these challenges.

A tool to assess livelihood preparedness for disasters: a study of Kaikōura earthquake in New Zealand
By studying the experience and perceptions of communities affected by the 2016 Kaikōura earthquake in New Zealand, this paper aims to develop an assessment tool for measuring livelihood preparedness. Results from a survey of 140 residents in Kaikōura who lived through the earthquake and its aftermath identified four indicators of livelihood preparedness, namely: resource accessibility, individual adaptive capacity, livelihood diversity, and the effectiveness of disaster risk reduction (DRR) measure.

The Asia Pacific Science and Technology conference for disaster risk reduction (APSTCDRR) 2022
The Asia Pacific Science and Technology Conference for Disaster Risk Reduction 2022 will share experiences on the use of S&T to address compound, cascading and systemic risk, foster exchanges on the contribution of S&T to inclusive risk governance, define the contribution of the Asia Pacific region to the implementation of global frameworks and roadmaps related to S&T for DRR, and review the contribution of S&T in the region to the implementation of the Sendai Framework to be reflected in the Mid-Term Review of the Sendai Framework.

The GEO Virtual Symposium 2022
We invite you to attend the GEO Virtual Symposium 2022, which will be held from 2-5 May. The symposium theme is Global Action for Local Impact, and the event will focus on supporting the development of the 2023-2025 GEO Work Programme (GWP).

CORE Webinar 1- Resilience of the society: A global perspective
The webinar will cover crisis management awareness & capability, Disaster Risk Reduction, the vulnerability in Disaster Risk Management, spontaneous volunteers, and possible impacts of main threats in Europe and possible adaptations.

Humanitarian Networks and Partnerships Weeks
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Areas of Common Concern at HNPW 2022 include Accountability to Affected Populations, the Climate Crisis, Inclusion, Localization and Coordination, Integrating of Security Risk Management across Humanitarian Action, Anticipatory Action, Organizational Culture and Power Relations, Nexus Environment and Emergency Response in a Pandemic.

Masterclass on Disaster Resilient Infrastructure Standards and Certifications
This masterclass will provide an overview of relevant standards for infrastructure resilience following a detailed insight on International Standard (ISO 14090:2019 Adaptation to Climate Change and the Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure standards (SuRe®)) and Certifications.

The Global Call to Action on Emergency Alerting
Despite today’s amazing telecommunications services, too many people in harm’s way still do not get timely and effective emergency alerts so they can protect lives and livelihoods. This session features five panellists, each will bring their perspective on the Call to Action, explaining how they are pursuing the objective as well as what challenges and opportunities they foresee.

March 2022: Publications in the Data Science Journal

Title: Global Community Guidelines for Documenting, Sharing, and Reusing Quality Information of Individual Digital Datasets
Author: Ge Peng , Carlo Lacagnina, Robert R. Downs, Anette Ganske, Hampapuram K. Ramapriyan, Ivana Ivánová, Lesley Wyborn, Dave Jones, Lucy Bastin, Chung-lin Shie, David F. Moroni
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-008
Title: Recommendations for Discipline-Specific FAIRness Evaluation Derived from Applying an Ensemble of Evaluation Tools
Author: Karsten Peters-von Gehlen , Heinke Höck, Andrej Fast, Daniel Heydebreck, Andrea Lammert, Hannes Thiemann
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-007

February 2022: Publications in the Data Science Journal

Title: A Deep-Learning Method for the Prediction of Socio-Economic Indicators from Street-View Imagery Using a Case Study from Brazil
Author: Jeaneth Machicao, Alison Specht, Danton Vellenich, Leandro Meneguzzi, Romain David, Shelley Stall, Katia Ferraz, Laurence Mabile, Margaret O’Brien, Pedro Corrêa
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-006
Title: Developing Metrics for NASA Earth Science Interdisciplinary Data Products and Services
Author: Zhong Liu , Chung-Lin Shie, Anthony J. Ritrivi, Guang-Dih Lei, Gary T. Alcott, Mary Greene, James Acker, Jennifer C. Wei, David J. Meyer, Angela Li, Atheer F. Al-Jazrawi
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-005
Title: OSSDIP: Open Source Secure Data Infrastructure and Processes Supporting Data Visiting
Author: Martin Weise , Filip Kovacevic, Nikolas Popper, Andreas Rauber
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-004
Title: Guidelines for Publicly Archiving Terrestrial Model Data to Enhance Usability, Intercomparison, and Synthesis
Author: Maegen B. Simmonds, William J. Riley, Deborah A. Agarwal, Xingyuan Chen, Shreyas Cholia, Robert Crystal-Ornelas, Ethan T. Coon, Dipankar Dwivedi, Valerie C. Hendrix, Maoyi Huang, Ahmad Jan, Zarine Kakalia, Jitendra Kumar, Charles D. Koven, Li Li, Mario Melara, Lavanya Ramakrishnan, Daniel M. Ricciuto, Anthony P. Walker, Wei Zhi, Qing Zhu, Charuleka Varadharajan
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-003

Disaster Risk Reduction and Open Data Newsletter: March 2022 Edition

Climate change: IPCC report warns of ‘irreversible’ impacts of global warming
Many of the impacts of global warming are now simply “irreversible” according to the UN’s latest assessment. But the authors of a new report say that there is still a brief window of time to avoid the very worst. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says that humans and nature are being pushed beyond their abilities to adapt.

Strengthening emergency communications for complex, cascading and compounding events – lessons learned from the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai eruption and tsunami in Tonga
While research communities are trying to better understand complex, compounding and cascading disasters, 2022 has just provided a ‘textbook’ example in Tonga. Tropical Cyclone Cody, the COVID-19 pandemic threat, and the eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano – followed by a tsunami and more than 70 earthquakes (magnitudes 4.4-5.0) between 14 January and 04 February 2022 – devastated the emergency management system in Tonga.

CREWS commits additional funding to strengthen Early Warning Systems in the Caribbean
Different and multiple hazards, such as severe weather conditions inland and at sea, droughts, hurricanes, floods, and earthquakes, pose a serious threat to the Caribbean –  one of the most disaster-prone regions in the world. The development of Early Warning Systems has been identified by the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and the Paris Agreement as a key pathway to prevent disasters and reduce the negative impacts of multiple hazards.

Limiting the damage: UN helps policymakers tackle climate change
As extreme weather events become commonplace, threatening communities and economies across the world, the UN is helping policymakers and leaders by projecting the impact of future climate hazards, and recommending the best, most cost-effective ways to adapt.

INFORM Risk Management Tool
INFORM is the first global, objective and transparent tool for understanding the risk of humanitarian crises. When all those involved in crisis prevention, preparedness and response use a shared risk assessment, they can work more effectively. That is why INFORM is open-source. INFORM has been developed in response to recommendations by numerous organisations to improve the common evidence basis for risk analysis, as well as the actual demands of INFORM partner organisations.

Climate Change 2022: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability
The Working Group II contribution to the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report assesses the impacts of climate change, looking at ecosystems, biodiversity, and human communities at global and regional levels. It also reviews vulnerabilities and the capacities and limits of the natural world and human societies to adapt to climate change. To read the summaries or the full report click the link.

Understanding hazards: Probabilistic cyclone modelling for disaster risk to the Eastern Coast in Bangladesh
Cyclones and associated wind and water hazards result in the most significant fatalities. In addition, coastal inundations due to cyclonic storm surges are an increasing threat to the lives and livelihoods of people in low-lying, highly populated coastal areas. This paper develops a synthetic cyclone modelling (Category 4) to understand the probable maximum impacts of a tropical cyclone and its cascading and compounding hazards in the Cox’s Bazar area in Bangladesh.

Scoping paper – Strategic crisis management in the EU – June 2021
This scoping paper sets out the key recommendations by the European Commission’s Group of Chief Scientific Advisors on how to enhance crisis preparedness, more integrated and timely response capacity, and resilient recovery for the EU are expected within the second quarter of this year.

European Environmental Agency Europe’s changing climate hazards – an index-based interactive EEA report
Climate change is happening, and we need to get ready for more intense heatwaves, floods and storms, wildfires and water scarcity. Different climate-related hazards affect regions, sectors of the economy and members of society in different ways. Decision-makers need the best data and information to help them understand the imperatives and make the necessary preparations. “Europe’s changing climate hazards – an interactive index-based EEA report”, brings it all together with an overview of past and projected changes in Europe’s most important climate hazards.

A Deep-Learning Method for the Prediction of Socio-Economic Indicators from Street-View Imagery Using a Case Study from Brazil
Socioeconomic indicators are essential to help design and monitor the impact of public policies on society. Over recent years other ways of collecting data and producing indicators have been explored, in particular using the new surveillance capabilities that remote observations can provide. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the assessment of socioeconomic indicators using street-view imagery, through a case study conducted in a region of Brazil, the Vale do Ribeira, one of the poorest semi-rural regions in Brazil.

Beyond Barriers: Solomon Islands Case Study
This case study explores the Solomon Islands’ progress in the integration of disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA), identifying key themes and opportunities for stakeholders to advance approaches that reduce risk and enhance resilience in communities

A crowdsourced global data set for validating built-up surface layers
Several global high-resolution built-up surface products have emerged over the last five years, taking full advantage of open sources of satellite data such as Landsat and Sentinel. However, these data sets require validation that is independent of the producers of these products. To fill this gap, we designed a validation sample set of 50 K locations using a stratified sampling approach independent of any existing global built-up surface products.

Domino Effect: Cascading disasters and lessons from the Tonga eruption and tsunami
Tonkin + Taylor in partnership with Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR), Committee on Data (CODATA) of the International Science Council (ISC) brings together experts to share: A forensic assessment of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai eruption and tsunami in Tonga, A cascading and compounding hazard assessment, Volcanic eruption and tsunami scenarios, Lessons learned and ways forward. Follow the link to sign up for this webinar.

 

28 Feb – 11 March -1st WWRP/SERA Weather and Society Conference 2022 (Online)
Extreme hydrometeorological events are affecting societies, economies and environments as never before in human history. Governments, science agencies, the humanitarian sector, emergency managers and decision-makers face an unprecedented challenge to reduce the risks to citizens and society. The Societal and Economics Research Application (SERA) Working Group of the WMO World Weather Research Programme (WWRP) invites the weather community to actively participate in the first Weather and Society Conference organised by this Programme.

Global Sustainability – Sustainable Education in the Digital Age
Prof. Stephen Yang will address that in the digital age when developing technology, we also need to reflect on the impact of ethics and social changes on education. Prof. Hiroaki Ogata will address that the Japanese government expects to launch 15 “International Leading Research Projects” in 2023, each with a total funding cap of 500 million yen over seven years, to support international joint research. Prof. Owen Lu will address that by applying ESG analytics technology to essay grading. Including how to use natural language processing technology to analyze corporate sustainability reports and media news?

Launch of Women’s Leadership in Disaster Risk Reduction
Women, girls, boys, men, and people of diverse gender identities have distinct vulnerabilities in each context that shape the way that they experience and recover from disaster impacts. Effective disaster risk reduction requires meaningful and diverse participation, engagement, and leadership, through an inclusive and accessible, all-of-society approach.

Flood forecasting for anticipatory action: applying flood models in humanitarian contexts
Flood forecasts can provide critical information to help people get ahead of rising water levels before a crisis unfolds. The speakers will explore examples of flood models, the spatial and temporal scale at which these models can provide risk information, how probabilistic models are interpreted, the uncertainties of these models, and where floods models have been used to inform anticipatory action.

Current approaches and GIS methods to support anticipatory humanitarian action
Geospatial data, GIS and remote sensing are of increasing importance in the humanitarian context and are currently experiencing increased use in the field of anticipatory humanitarian action. In this advanced course, you have the opportunity to explore the application areas of geodata in humanitarian contexts.

January 2022: Publications in the Data Science Journal

Title: A Framework for Data-Driven Solutions with COVID-19 Illustrations
Author: Kassim S. Mwitondi , Raed A. Said
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-002
Title: Open Science – For Whom?
Author: Martin Dominik, Justine Germo Nzweundji, Nova Ahmed, Sandro Carnicelli, Nurzatil Sharleeza Mat Jalaluddin, David Fernandez Rivas, Vanny Narita, Shymaa Enany, Clarissa Rios Rojas
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2022-001
Title: We Can Make a Better Use of ORCID: Five Observed Misapplications
Author:Miriam Baglioni, Paolo Manghi, Andrea Mannocci, Alessia Bardi
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/ds,j-2021-038
Title: Methods to Capture User Information Needs: Design Principles for Open Data Intermediaries and Data Providers
Author:Elisabeth Gebka, Jonathan Crusoe, Karin Ahlin
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/ds,j-2021-037

Disaster Risk Reduction and Open Data Newsletter: February 2022 Edition

Why the Tonga tsunami arrived much earlier and much larger than expected
The tsunami recorded at distant locations from the Tonga volcanic explosion arrived much earlier and was much larger than expected from an earthquake-generated tsunami. This event caused great difficulty in issuing timely and accurate tsunami warnings for the following three reasons described in the article.

Volunteered rapid disaster monitoring and mapping (VoRDM)
The Kingdom of Tonga and its people are reeling from the violent January 15 eruption of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano and the ensuing tsunami. CODATA TG FAIR Data for DRR, China GEO Aerospace Information Research Institute in the Chinese Academy of Sciences (AIR) and Tonkin + Taylors  Disaster Risk Resilience team is working hard to map the devastation accurately and smoothly the way for more efficient humanitarian efforts and recovery.

Long-term planning crucial to Tonga’s recovery
As recovery efforts began in Tonga, after the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai volcano eruption and the tsunami that followed, the first priority will be to provide immediate relief to communities to save lives and respond to urgent needs. However, successful recovery must also incorporate long-term strategies of building back better and establishing resilience, mitigation, risk reduction and preparedness initiatives.

2021 floods: UN researchers aim to better prepare for climate risks
In July 2021, several European countries, including Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands, were affected by catastrophic floods, causing deaths and widespread damage. According to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), such extreme weather events are expected to increase frequency and severity in the coming decades.

A framework for global science in support of risk-informed sustainable development and planetary health
This document takes stock of recent developments in disaster risk science. It provides a compelling set of directions for research and scientific collaboration for a more holistic and collaborative approach to understanding and managing risks. It challenges silos in science and in society and the notion that social, ecological, economic and technological systems can be understood in isolation from one another and advocates for an increased focus on people.

Tsunami risk communication and management: Contemporary gaps and challenges
Very large tsunamis are associated with low probabilities of occurrence. In many parts of the world, these events have usually occurred in a distant time in the past. As a result, there is a low-risk perception and a lack of collective memories, making tsunami risk communication challenging and complex. Furthermore, immense challenges lie ahead as population and risk exposure increase in coastal areas.

UK climate change risk assessment 2022
As required by the Climate Change Act 2008, the UK government has undertaken the third five-year assessment of the risks of climate change in the UK. The risk assessment considers sixty-one UK-wide climate risks and opportunities cutting across multiple sectors of the economy. It prioritises eight risk areas for action, discussed in the document.

Creating resilient futures: Integrating disaster risk reduction, sustainable development goals and climate change adaptation agendas
This book examines a coherence building opportunity between Climate Change Adaptation, the Sustainable Development Goals and Disaster Risk Reduction agendas. Considers opportunities to address global challenges in the context of developing resilience as an integrated development continuum instead of through independent and siloed agendas.

City Resilience Program: Supporting cities in building resilience
This Making Cities Resilient 2030 (MCR2030) webinar session aims to provide in-depth information to help cities, local authorities, and their partners better understand what the City Resilience Program is and how to access its support. It will include information on the type of support provided, the eligibility criteria and the relevant application process.

CREWS workshop on people-centred early warning systems operational procedures
CREWS invite participants to register interest in participating in a 2-hour workshop (in French and English) to discuss CREWS People-Centered Early Warning Systems (EWS) Operational Procedures. The workshop is an opportunity for people with experience of people-centred EWS and design, implementation and monitoring of CREWS projects to share experiences and contribute to finalising.

Pre-Conference Workshops – African kick-off conference for the UN decade of ocean science for sustainable development
The Conference will provide a forum to take stock of the state of ocean science and technology in the region, to deliberate on how ocean science in Africa should be supported and focused on achieving the societal outcomes required by the Decade, and also seek the interest and commitment of the ocean science community to engage in a number of research directions that are essential for sustainable ocean management.

SHEAR Common Ground: Science for humanitarian emergencies and resilience
It is our great pleasure to invite you to join us on February 11th at our SHEAR finale event, in which we will be celebrating our achievements, finding common ground and charting the way forward. We are excited to share and discuss pressing humanitarian-science questions and the outcomes of the SHEAR programme through a high-energy and interactive virtual event.

Artificial intelligence for natural disaster management
This Webinar will explore the main barriers to adopting these disruptive technologies in disaster management and examine the integrated approaches related to machine learning, big data analytics, and AI for supporting the detection, forecasting, and communication of natural hazards disasters.  In this context, the Webinar will provide an overview of how AI can be leveraged to enhance modelling across spatiotemporal scales and facilitate effective communication in the event of a natural disaster

November 2021: Publications in the Data Science Journal

Title: A Framework for Data-Driven Solutions with COVID-19 Illustrations
Author: Kassim S. Mwitondi , Raed A. Said
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/dsj-2021-036
Title: Interconnecting Systems Using Machine-Actionable Data Management Plans – Hackathon Report
Author: João Cardoso, Leyla Jael Castro, Tomasz Miksa
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/ds,j-2021-035
Title: Keeping Track of Samples in Multidisciplinary Fieldwork
Author: Pål Gunnar Ellingsen, Lara Ferrighi, Øystein Godøy, Tove Margrethe Gabrielsen
URL: http://doi.org/10.5334/ds,j-2021-034

Disaster Risk Reduction and Open Data Newsletter: December 2021 Edition

World Bank: Disaster risk insurance: 5 insights from the Philippines
With disasters a growing threat, insurance for countries trying to manage climate and disaster risk is becoming increasingly critical. While insight on what works – and what doesn’t – to build resilience is still limited, the experience of the Philippines shows how countries can improve their protection to disasters by working with international insurance markets.

Science supporting policy in disaster risk management: providing the data and knowledge for transitioning to a climate-proof resilient society
The representatives of the EC’s Joint Research Centre recently discussed the INFORM risk assessment, an evidence-based methodology to support decision-making on humanitarian crises and disasters, extended recently to the regions of Caucasus and Central Asia and South Eastern Europe

Kiribati: Fishing for food and resilience
Located in the centre of the Pacific, the Republic of Kiribati is known for being one of the world’s smallest and most remote island nations. In fact, it is remarkably large: 33 atoll islands spread across an ocean territory of more than 3.5 million square kilometers. The vast waters – one of the world’s biggest Exclusive Economic Zones – constitute some of the richest and most diverse ecosystems on Earth, supporting hundreds of species as well as the livelihoods, health, culture, and way of life of local people. However, in the global narratives about climate change, island nations such as Kiribati have been seen as ‘poster children’ for the risks of a warming planet.

The need for medium-range forecasting in early warning systems to improve risk outcomes
High-impact weather events – floods, storms, cyclones – threaten human life and property, as well as affecting the economy and inflicting significant societal hazards. Being able to predict these events accurately, and with sufficient lead times, enables people to prepare for them. It is also more cost-effective: a dollar invested in disaster preparedness – which reduces people’s vulnerability to the impacts – can prevent six dollars’ worth of disaster-related economic losses.

One billion children at ‘extremely high risk’ of climate impacts
Young people living in the Central African Republic, Chad, Nigeria, Guinea, and Guinea-Bissau are the most at risk of the impacts of climate change, threatening their health, education, and protection, and exposing them to deadly diseases, according to a UNICEF report launched today. ‘The Climate Crisis Is a Child Rights Crisis: Introducing the Children’s Climate Risk Index’ is the first comprehensive analysis of climate risk from a child’s perspective. It ranks countries based on children’s exposure to climate and environmental shocks, such as cyclones and heatwaves, as well as their vulnerability to those shocks, based on their access to essential services.

Post-disaster needs assessments guidelines: Volume B – Environment
The main objective of PDNA–Environment is to prepare a recovery strategy that guides the restoration of environment and natural resources damaged due to a disaster. This should also enable environmentally friendly rebuilding in all sectors. The recovery plan also supports the restoration of environment and natural resources as a disaster risk reduction (DRR) strategy.

Words into Action: Nature-based solutions for disaster risk reduction
This guide aims to give practical, how-to-do information on setting up and implementing nature-based solutions (NbS), especially for disaster risk reduction (DRR), but also for climate change adaptation (CCA). It is designed to help implement the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 (hereafter referred to as the Sendai Framework). The Sendai Framework recognizes that environmental degradation can cause hazards and that disasters also have an impact on the environment.

From protection to prevention: The role of cooperative and mutual insurance in DRR
This report, prepared by the ICMIF-UNDRR collaboration, presents seven mechanisms gleaned from case studies compiled across the cooperative and mutual insurance sector and from a literature review on the role of insurance in supporting disaster risk reduction and resilience. It focuses on preventing new risks and reducing existing risk is more urgent than ever because disasters can erase development gains and hinder progress, often for years to come, such as in the case of floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, pandemics or major technological disasters.

UNDRR Briefing Package for UN Resident Coordinators and UN Country Teams
This briefing package sets out how UNDRR can better support UNRCs and UNCTs to deliver sustainable development benefits at a country level from a DRR angle. The options proposed here can be adjusted to meet the needs of the regional UN development system architecture. This package includes an information checklist, support tools and information that UNDRR has developed to support national governments and UN partners to reduce risks and losses as guided by the Sendai Framework.

 Can ecosystems protect populations? New evidence published
While it is generally assumed that ecosystems, such as mangroves, coral reefs or sand dunes, play an important role in reducing risks from hazard events, there are few comprehensive studies that gather scientific evidence on the services these ecosystems provide, and the functions they fulfil for disaster risk reduction.

Nature-Based Solutions for Urban Resilience: Linking Science, Tech, Policy and Practice
Objectives of the webinar include discussing the current state of nature-based solutions that are undertaken globally and identifying success stories and how this can be replicated to scale for impact.

Workshop Announcement and Call for Applications: Enlargement and Integration – Digital Transformation, Data and AI in the Western Balkans
The workshop “Digital Transformation, Data and AI in the Western Balkans” aims to investigate how digital technologies, data and AI influence changes in our societies. Europe’s ambition is to become the world-leading region for developing and deploying cutting edge, ethical and secure AI, as well as to promote a human-centric approach in the global context.

9th Global Dialogue Platform on Anticipatory Humanitarian Action – Virtual Edition: 7th – 9th December 2021
Join us for a series of panel discussions, thematic presentations and interactive events that will bring together practitioners, scientists and government representatives from around the world to explore how anticipatory action can address the compounding and intertwined effects of the climate crisis, rising conflicts and economic shocks on the world’s most vulnerable people.

International Science Council – Health Inequalities: New Methods, Better Insights?
At this conference of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the final report of the ALLEA/FEAM Health Inequalities project will be presented to a wider audience. The technical contents of this report, ‘Health inequalities: new methods, better insights?’, have already been discussed extensively at a series of well-attended workshops. This conference aims to provide a forum for discussing the implications of the report for research and policy. How can new research methods help us to better understand health inequalities, and how can better science help policymakers to reduce health inequalities more effectively?

#AGU21: Science is Society
The AGU Fall Meeting is the primary gathering for Earth and space scientists, students, and those in affiliated fields to share scientific findings and identify innovative solutions. With in-person and worldwide online participation, attendees will have numerous opportunities to network with government regulators, scientific visionaries, and industry thought-leaders. Join our diverse community in New Orleans and Online Everywhere 13 – 17 December 2021.

20th Swiss Climate Summer School 2022 – Extreme weather and climate
Swiss Climate Research, the network of leading Swiss institutions in climate research and education, invites young scientists (PhD students and postdocs) to join high-profile climate researchers in a scenic Swiss Alpine setting for keynote lectures, workshops and poster sessions on the occasion of the 20th Swiss Climate Summer School 2022.